International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development

International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development


International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development
Vol. 4, Issue 9 (2017)

Craft: A contemporary narrative


Sanjeev Kumar Jharkhede, Dr. Poonam Sachdev

Commonly, craft is envisaged as a process. ‘Craft only exists in motion. It is a way of doing things, not a classification of objects, institution, or people’ (Adamson, 2007).
In India, during the 5000 years of urban evolution since the Harappan period, the articles were produced for local consumption and, to a lesser extent for use in trade or barter. All the articles were utilitarian, be it for everyday use or for ritual purpose, and concern of the community as a whole. Its original function became extinct once the artifact had served its purpose and the religious ceremony had been performed. The artist-craftsman was intimately bound up with the caste and trade he was born in with seemingly no religious restriction in professional activities. He has always fulfilled the needs of the entire community as well as worked for patrons on ambitious artistic court and temple projects, where his work would reflect the desired aesthetic sensibility.
Post-independence, machine made alternatives gave more options to choose from; hence the craftsmen’s exclusive masterpiece took a back seat. On the other hand, many rural/tribal level social structures collapsed or got absorbed into modern industrial society. This led to the alienation of various crafts products /practices from the society. Hence future generations of the craft community with restricted opportunity to practice them, lost their technical and artistic skills.
In India, during the latter half of the twentieth century, rapid changes in the society and lifestyle led to the formation of new psychographic zones. These major changes in the lifestyle of the average Indian were also observed internationally, which can be summed up in the statement by Margaret Thatcher during an interview in Women's Own magazine that “…there is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families…” (Keay, 1987) [1]. In the Indian society, earlier every product had specific cultural connotations, which were understood within the regional communities. The new cultural institutions have stripped away the age old meaning and purpose associated with each product. Now the product is individualistic with emotive connotations and global in its application. These connotations appeal to the psychographics extending to an individual’s own persona and surroundings and have risen from cross cultural interactions across the globe. For instance, gifting a rose to express one’s love and amorous feelings for the other is not mentioned in Indian culture anywhere, but its connotations are now well understood within Indian communities.
For the new and highly individualistic product, a new skill set was required which was made possible with the varied use of technology. Technology became craft; the way it is applied and the will and the idea behind it paved the way for a new generation of techno-craftsmen.
This paper would focus on innovative application of technology to create an exclusive product for an individual vis-à-vis a community.
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How to cite this article:
Sanjeev Kumar Jharkhede, Dr. Poonam Sachdev. Craft: A contemporary narrative. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development, Volume 4, Issue 9, 2017, Pages 213-215
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research and Development